Columbia Daily Tribune Covers ICCF-18 Conference

The Columbia Daily Tribune, newspaper from the hometown of the University of Missouri is carrying an article by Karin Spory on the the upcoming International Conference on Cold Fusion (ICCF-18) which will take place at the University starting on July 21st.

Key quotes in the article come from Mark Prelas, professor of nuclear engineering at Mizzou, who was prevented from conducting research in LENR at the university in 1991 after the scientific community turned sour on cold fusion. Things have changed now with the Sidney Kimmel Institute for Nuclear Renaissance now hosted at the university. Prelas states, “What we’re doing is developing tools to just look at very basic things occurring in this event.”

Robert Duncan, Vice Chancellor of Research at MU states:

“The fact that we’re seeing something here that we don’t understand — I see it as a huge opportunity for basic physics research to try to understand why we don’t understand it . . . I would like to understand the underpinning physics because once you understand what’s going on, you have a way of predicting and designing things that may be useful.”

It’s articles like this that could interest people outside the small (but passionate) community of LENR supporters. My guess is that probably less than .1 per cent of the general public around the world has heard of the recent developments in the LENR field — and so are unaware that we could be on the cusp of a flowering of a very important new energy source. It will be interesting to see how much coverage the conference gets from the press. My understanding that this year is the first time the ICCF will be hosted at a research university, so that could bring it more attention than usual.

  • Yona

    Hi
    How it is possible for Andrea Rossi to keep in secret a factory location?

    • GreenWin

      Oh MY… Yona, if you check Andrea Rossi’s JONP Board of Advisers you will find the name of a gentleman who works for the United States Navy. Navy keep secrets rather well. And see fortyniner’s reply to your previous confusions.

      • fortyniner

        I have a feeling that Yona is going to work his/her way through the complete pathoskep’s handbook. This could get tedious.

  • Yona

    Hi
    I read here that you think that Andrea Rossi partner is DEKA company,
    so why not asking DEKA company for comment on this?

    Thanks

  • georgehants

    Peter, probably what you can look forward to in your back garden when our scientific overseers build the new nuclear plants while the rest of the World moves away from them.
    Who are our scientific advisers to the government?
    Have they all received their knighthoods and pension plans yet I wonder?
    ——
    New York Times
    TOKYO — The operator of the tsunami-ravaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant stood ready Thursday to inject boric acid into one of its most heavily damaged reactors after it found steam emanating from the reactor building. The preventive measure would stave off criticality, or an uncontrolled nuclear chain reaction, in the reactor’s damaged core.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/19/world/asia/steam-detected-at-damaged-fukushima-reactor.html?_r=0

    • fortyniner

      George – yes, with knobs on. The EDF reactor design for Hinkley is intended for ‘mixed’ fuelling – i.e., MOX (plutonium). Even though initial licensing is for uranium only I believe that this is the design of choice as it will allow the seeping piles of plutonium at Sellafied to be disposed of profitably at a later date.

      If there is ever a serious problem, given the predominant SW airflow in the UK, either of the 1.6GW reactors has the potential to render most of the country south of Manchester uninhabitable, especially if fuelled by plutonium. Reassurances about the safety of nuclear installations look rather hollow after Fukushima – I’m sure the Japanese public were fed exactly the same cr*p before the meltdown.

      • georgehants

        Now would it be worth these scientific geniuses taking a look at Cold Fusion, to Research and find if the transmutation possibilities have merit.
        If so then all the Worlds nuclear crap could be turned into useful fairy dust and peacefully scattered on a garden of remembrance to the people who have died etc. from radiation poisoning.

      • daniel maris

        Absolute insanity isn’t it? Imagine the cost and human misery of declaring an area inhabited by 20 million an exclusion zone. Well it really is beyond imagination.

        The risk is real. Even if you were 100% confident in the safety of your technology (not possible of course) the reality is the UK faces a potent terrorist threat and one cannot rule out an inside job by a terrorist overriding safety checks. People may have forgotten we have the example in Glasgow a few years back of two highly trained surgeons who were actually under cover Al Queda agents, who conned everyone into believing they were just medical professionals, before ultimately trying to launch a terrorist attack (blowing up an airport terminal building).

        No other technology, apart perhaps from big hydro, is so vulnerable to terrorists as nuclear fission.

  • Yona

    Hi
    How do you know Andrea Rossi partner it is real?
    He didn’t prove that.
    Thanks

    • fortyniner

      On balance and in order to enable discussion, many contributors here provisionally accept certain things as being more likely to be true rather than untrue – even in the absence of absolute proof. It’s up to each individual to decide where the balance of probability lies, based on available evidence. If you are not of similar mind then perhaps this is not a forum that would interest you.

  • artefact

    From Dr. Bobs log

    “Breaking News:

    Defkalion Green Technologies have arranged for two public demonstrations during next week.
    This company originates from Greece but struggled with fundings and left for Canada last year because of the delicate economic situation in their home country.

    Company will perform 2 demos from 2 different locations (Vancouver and Milano) during next week.
    First demonstration 22 July 2013
    For European Audience the demos will be 23rd July. (possible earlier)

    http://www.peswiki.com/index.php/Main_Page

    Before these demonstrations announcements will be made on EGO OUT and Defkalions webpages.

    It is the companies R5 reactor that will be tested and science journals and skeptics have been invited to participate. Lets hope for the best… God Bless!”

    http://www.drboblog.com/defkalion-public-demonstration/

  • GreenWin

    Big Boys Enter Cold Fusion:

    In a very interesting disclosure Ruby Carat at CFNow! has taken a close look at the Larry Forsley (former SPAWAR, now Global Energy Corp) patent for the GeNiE – a hybrid nuclear fusion fast fission reactor. This “invention” utilizes the SPAWAR/Navy/JWK patent previously issued called “Method of generating particles…” as its source of neutrons.

    Now HERE is the interesting part; in the patent Acknowledgments we find this sentence: “This manuscript has been co-authored by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the US Department of Energy.”

    So who is National Security Technologies,LLC?? Essentially they operate the 1,360-square-mile Nevada National Security Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. It is a joint venture between Northrop Grumman Corporation, and three tech management partners: AECOM, CH2M Hill, and Babcock & Wilcox. All are “big boys” in guv’mnt DOE operations.

    Looks very much like it is this Northrup Grumman JV that is actually, building/designing the cold fusion-based hybrid fusion/fission reactor for Global Energy Corp. We have yet to see such a device demonstrated; it makes lofty claims. But it is the first acknowledgment of cold fusion used by major DOE players to build a new type fusion reactor. No tokamak or ICF (hot fusion) gadgets necessary.

    • daniel maris

      Well very interesting – as far as I understand the science, which isn’t much.

    • MK

      Great find. So it looks they are really designing a nuclear waste “burner”, that should generate useable energy and could be intrinsically save (under critical).

    • fortyniner

      Thanks for your diligent research GW. I suppose that there is an inevitability about the big boys’ interest in using the tech to build CF-driven waste-burning fission reactors, rather than viewing CF as an energy source in itself. As well as used fuel, such reactors could also utilise uranium 238 and other relatively stable energy sources, extending the life of the nuclear fission industry indefinitely.

      But with the kind of resources that NST will have at their disposal it would be surprising if that arm of CF research wasn’t proceeding in parallel, if only so they can control it through patent ownership.

      • GreenWin

        There is no telling if this thing will actually work, though in theory it could. Burning used fuel rods IS a reasonable answer to the waste issue which has frozen new fission licensing in the U.S. by Federal Court Order. This is a complicated face saving approach for the fissionists.

        As for using CF as a sole source of energy – well, that might require too great an admission of past ignorance. But yes, if NST is already into this, they will surely see the potential for a CF reactor – though they have no Ni H experience we know of.

        On whole what we do have is a paper trail leading to acceptance of Cold Fusion by its heretofore greatest enemy, U.S. Dept of Energy. They pay NST the tidy sum of $350M annually. Perhaps NST will miraculously “discover” a new form of low cost, clean, abundant energy. Perhaps they will make a phone call to Leonardo Corp to that end.

        At least you have another bit of evidence to oppose the insanity contemplated at Hinkley.

    • Bernie Koppenhofer

      Very interesting, thanks GreenWin. I wonder what our physicist skeptics have to say about patent and if they can explain away the physics theory it seems to disrupt?

    • georgehants

      Would this be worth an editorial in one of the premier science comics or is there a good scientific reason for them to stay silent.

      • fortyniner

        Only bad unscientific reasons I suspect.

    • khawk

      While I may have missed it, I’ve searched the Spawar 919B1 patent (Boss,Forely et all – System and Method for Generating Particles) and cannot find a reference to National Security Technologies. Expanding the search.

  • winebuff

    Its going to take a lot more convincing to get big governments to pay attention. Apathy and ineptitude are the norm. Sadly

    • Kim

      If it does not have the smell
      of “Big Money” there is total oblivion.

      This is the way we operate as a society.

      It reeks of apathy.

      Respect
      Kim

    • Jimr

      I thought that also, but with emphasis on clean energy in all countries, I cannot believe the leaders would pass up an opportunity to look good. I suspect there is much more research going on than we are aware of by government agencies. Or they feel the technology is not advanced or proven enough to fully fund.

      • fortyniner

        Either that, or they are quite happy about trousering all the extra ‘green’ taxes they can gouge out of us for having the temerity to use fuel when we drive to work, and to heat our homes during the winter.

    • Ken

      Rossi still has a lot to prove in order to convince people he’s legitimate. Some of the reasons that people are still skeptical may be seen over at (http://revolution-green.com/2013/07/02/rossi-and-9-lives-of-the-e-cat/).

      While I personally believe he’s made progress in the field, I still hold that he’s inflated his true progress in the past and it’s difficult to trust him with his prior record of deceit.

      Ken

      (http://www.revolution-green.com)

      • fortyniner

        For what seems like the thousandth time, Rossi doesn’t need to prove anything to anyone, least of all to pathological skeptics such as your good self (attempted camouflage duly disregarded). Mark Dansie is a professional debunker whose real motives are obscure, and articles such as the one you link to are of little importance. As Rossi has said on many occasions, the proof will be in the end results of his work.

        But this is not about Rossi, its about a new, clean energy source. All that matters is that a working cold fusion energy device becomes available on the commercial market, and it really doesn’t matter whether it comes from Rossi or anyone else working in the field. There will be plenty of egg to go round for people like Dansie in due course.

      • Roger Bird

        Ken, one of Mark Danise’s assumptions is: “Accept that independent verification using scientific methodology will always be a requirement.” Well, it just ain’t so; it is an untrue assumption. Personal experience by spending averse business people will be sufficient. I am a big Rossi believer, but if he asked me for my money, I would suddenly become a Rossi skeptic demanding personal experience.

  • Roger Bird

    So, apparently Franks “vacation” really was a vacation and not a trip to visit with Rossi and see a real e-cat in action. Too bad. (:-<)

  • georgehants

    Phys-org
    A green energy future.
    A team of University researchers have found that a large majority of the British public support moves to an efficient, clean, fair, and safe energy system but distrust remains a concern.
    http://phys.org/news/2013-07-green-energy-future.html

    • fortyniner

      Morning George.

      The fact that our utterly inept politicians have signed the UK up for 15% total ‘renewable’ energy by 2020, whilst apparently thinking that the deal was for 15% electrical generation that they could meet with new nuclear (apparently now a ‘renewable’) doesn’t help the credibility of ‘green’ initiatives.

      So now we are importing American wood pellets to feed our formerly coal-fired generators, at enormous cost and dubious ‘sustainability’. These people are not competent to run a stall at a boot sale, let alone a country.

      • georgehants

        Morning Peter, I have put a quote below in answer to GreenWin that seems to cover your point, unfortunately it has gone to the dreaded moderation, I think because I used the word “and.”
        I know I can be annoying but I think that until we all realise that the only way to moderate and remove corruption is to remove the cause that in virtuly all cases is money,(capitalism)and power.
        Everybody put into a position of any authority should only be put there by a vote of all their peers and those effected by their position.
        No quangos, no appointing one’s son-in-law to high positions, just always voted in by all concerned on ability, personality and goals.
        We do not get a chance to vote for who we may choose at an election as the “candidate” has already been vetted and chosen on his conformity to party lines.
        The end result is just a choice between the few powerful people in each party that set the agenda that all candidates must follow.
        People are to busy in most cases trying to pay the mortgage etc. to take notice or support any “independent” candidate, also they know that that candidate would be overwhelmed in the house by the steam-rollering majors position.
        This of course apply’s equally to the scientific world that leads to the horrors we are witnessing with Cold Fusion and many others areas.
        Morning Peter, I have put a quote below in answer to GreenWin that seems to cover your point, unfortunately it has gone to the dreaded moderation, I think because I used the word “and.”
        I know I can be annoying but I think that until we all realise that the only way to moderate and remove corruption is to remove the cause that in virtuly all cases is money,(capitalism)and power.
        Everybody put into a position of any authority should only be put there by a vote of all their peers and those effected by their position.
        No quangos, no appointing one’s son-in-law to high positions, just always voted in by all concerned on ability, personality and goals.
        We do not get a chance to vote for who we may choose at an election as the “candidate” has already been vetted and chosen on his conformity to party lines.
        The end result is just a choice between the few powerful people in each party that set the agenda that all candidates must follow.
        People are to busy in most cases trying to pay the mortgage etc. to take notice or support any “independent” candidate, also they know that that candidate would be overwhelmed in the house by the steam-rollering majors position.
        This of course apply’s equally to the scientific world that leads to the horrors we are witnessing with Cold Fusion and many others areas.
        —-
        I think I am in trouble, my brain is now age 98.
        Heavy Smokers, Drinkers Brain Age 36% Faster
        http://www.futurepundit.com/archives/009140.html

        • georgehants

          Oops, something went wrong there but it is worth reading twice. Ha.
          Maybe admin could remove the second copy.

        • Pedro

          Very OT but related to our failing democratic system. Nice TED talk: http://www.ted.com/talks/eric_x_li_a_tale_of_two_political_systems.html

          • Roger Bird

            Very interesting. Food for a lot of thought. I have said over and over, and I am not alone in saying this, that the collective character of a nation determines it’s health, that the structure is mostly a symptom, less of a cause than most people think.

        • fortyniner

          Apart from the top politicians, who have their agendas set from above, it seems to me to be more a question of the type of people who want to lord it over the rest of us actually being less knowledgable and let competent than the average. Like coppers, but with a university arts/humanities education and less inclination to fit people up or to assault them (at least face to face).

          I think my brain age is probably only about 90 (I don’t smoke and always stop drinking when I fall into a stupor). My knees feel about 98 though.

          • Iggy Dalrymple

            “Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard.” – H.L. Mencken

            • Roger Bird

              “The common people generally know what their interests are. But the wise usually know best how to fulfill those interests. How we decide who the wise people are I have not yet figured out. Democracy is no guarantee that we will pick wise people to govern us.” — Roger Bird

              • Pedro

                It get’s worst when the common people have to base their choices on information controlled by a small elite. The elite (and their lobyists) can control the vote through media manipulation.
                Either “beneign” as in “we know what’s best for you” or evil as in “we know what’s best for us”.
                No true democracy without true free (as in: free of manipulation) press.
                Sceptics however would say that the common people rather read about sport than about the imported choices that have to be made. And that’s true also. Especially if the media pick up on this preference by hyping the sport and playing down the dull politics. Hype sells! Catch 22.

          • Iggy Dalrymple

            “In Italy, for thirty years under the Borgias, they had warfare, terror, murder, bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love; they had 500 years of democracy and peace — and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock.” – Orson Welles

            • daniel maris

              Not true of course…the Swiss filed almost as many patent applications as the UK – with about 13% of the UK’s population.

            • Roger Bird

              LOL. Iggy, you always satisfy, always, with your wit or someone else’s wit. (:->)

            • Barry

              Iggy, Defkalion is the “dark horse” right?

        • Roger Bird

          I go into moderation each and every time because my name is spelled “Roger Bird”. (:->)

      • Steve H

        Just brilliant!
        What a forum……

  • Blanco69

    The prospect of a potential live Defkalion demo has got me quite excited. I know there’s plenty of scope for a sneaky wire or a cosmic ray gun supplying copious quantities of enegy to make the reactor appear to be running at COP>1 but I dont care. No fraudster in his right mind would attempt something like this to attempt to relieve some gullible investors of some cash so when the skepts start throwing mud about magic tricks and special visual effects I wont be listening.

    • jfab

      “No fraudster in his right mind would attempt something like this”

      Sigh.
      Haven’t you heard of Steorn and their infamous “demo” with the secret battery in plain sight?

      • Blanco69

        OK jfab,

        You can point out DGT’s hidden(or not)battery once we’ve had a look at their demo.

        • fortyniner

          Oh, he will, he will…

        • GreenWin

          It is often said you can hide things in plain site – because people do not connect dots. A visible battery at a magnetic motor demo is not a “secret.”

          A secret is unseen, officially denied like NSA’s Prism program to listen to your phone calls and read your e-mails. It is no longer a “secret” when some courageous soul tells the citizens about it.

          • Gerrit

            and gets an asylum in Russia in return.

            mmm … there is an “in soviet Russia” joke in there somewhere

          • Blanco69

            Well said GW. Courageous indeed.

  • GreenWin

    A balanced and honest article from the only mainstream newspaper in the States with the moral and ethical fortitude to match that of Dr. Robert Duncan and the SKINR scientists.

    “Few men are willing to brave the disapproval of their fellows, the censure of their colleagues, the wrath of their society. Moral courage is a rarer commodity than bravery in battle or great intelligence. Yet it is the one essential, vital quality for those who seek to change a world which yields most painfully to change.”
    -Robert F. Kennedy 1966

    • Barry

      Well put GW and RFK.

    • georgehants

      “All boundaries are conventions, waiting to be transcended. One may transcend any convention if only one can first conceive of doing so.”
      Robert Frobisher, Cloud Atlas.
      —–
      And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch.
      Matthew 15:14

      • fortyniner

        Finally – a quote from the bibble worth quoting. The other is not bad either!

  • Iggy Dalrymple

    Finding the keys to boiling heat transfer
    A team of Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers has succeeded in carrying out the first systematic investigation of the factors that control boiling heat transfer from a surface to a liquid. This process is crucial to the efficiency of power plants and the cooling of high-power electronics, and could even lead to improvements in how vehicles travel through water.

    The research deals with a key transition point known as the critical heat flux, or CHF, a value of heat transfer, per unit time and area, where a surface’s heat-transfer characteristics suddenly change: For example, when the cooling panels of an electronics system become covered with a layer of vapor that blocks heat transfer, the resulting rise in temperature can damage or destroy the equipment. The new findings could raise the value of CHF, providing extra safety margins or operating ranges for such equipment.
    ~~~
    The new work grew out of the team’s earlier studies of —nanoparticles suspended in water—for possible use in nuclear-plant cooling systems. They found that the nanoparticles, which tended to deposit on surfaces, raised the CHF, potentially boosting safety in the plant.

    But it was unclear exactly why this worked. Co-author Michael Rubner, the TDK Professor of Polymer Materials Science and Engineering at MIT, says that when Buongiorno “indicated that enhancements in CHF appear to be related to the deposition of nanoparticles onto surfaces, we got excited since we had developed methodologies for systematically depositing nanoparticles onto surfaces with nanoscale control over thickness, wettability and porosity. Using these methodologies, we were able to produce well-defined surface characteristics and structures that made it possible to sort out the important factors at play in the process.”

    Based on the new tests, the team determined that the nanoparticles form a hydrophilic porous coating on the surface, accounting for the improvement. The earlier “common wisdom” among researchers, Buongiorno says, had been that wettability alone, not porosity, was the main property accounting for increases in CHF.

    Co-author Tom McKrell, an MIT research scientist, says, “It was the multidisciplinary team that allowed for this finding.” Without the team’s expertise in surface nanoengineering, surface characterization and thermal hydraulics, he adds, the relative contributions of these attributes to CHF “would have remained a mystery.”

    For most applications—such as fuel rods in nuclear power plants or liquid cooling systems in high-power electronics—it is desirable for CHF to be as high as possible. But for some applications—such as drag-reduction on the surface of objects moving underwater—a low CHF is desirable; the new analysis shows how to reduce the CHF by applying a hydrophobic, porous coating to the surface.
    http://www.rdmag.com/news/2013/07/finding-keys-boiling-heat-transfer?et_cid=3371488&et_rid=556728257&type=cta

    • Iggy Dalrymple

      That last sentence about applying a hydrophobic coating to reduce drag on a vessel moving through water makes me think that applying “Rustoleum NeverWet” to a speedboat would give it a racing edge.
      http://www.geek.com/science/neverwet-superhydrophobic-spray-hits-stores-this-week-1560808/

      • TPaign

        That may be slightly similar to the breakthrough which allowed for supersonic torpedoes. Gas is emitted from the torpedo’s nose cone, which causes the torpedo to be enveloped by an air pocket, and thus significantly reduces friction.

        • Blanco69

          This brings us back to cavitation. The schval torpedo caused enough interest to turn part of the Barents Sea into a submarine traffic jam. Unfortunately, the Kursk didn’t make it out of there intact. Very sad. There’s definitely some worthwhile science in there though.

          • Roger Bird

            Don’t feel bad for the Kursk crew. They not only didn’t know what hit them. They didn’t even know that they had been hit. Absolutely no pain whatsoever.

            I can just see the former Ivan say to the former Vlad, “What just happened?”

            And the former Vlad, who used to pray regularly, said, “I think that we are dead.”

            • daniel maris

              Not a very appropriate comment.

              FROM WIKIPEDIA

              Captain Lieutenant Dmitriy Kolesnikov, one of the survivors of the first explosion, survived in Compartment 9 at the very stern of the boat after blasts destroyed the forward spaces of the submarine. Recovery workers found notes on his body. They showed 23 sailors (out of 118 aboard) had waited in the dark with him.

              There has been much debate over how long the sailors might have survived. Some, particularly on the Russian side, say they would have died very quickly; water is known to leak into a stationary Oscar-II craft through the propeller shafts. Others point out that many potassium superoxide chemical cartridges, used to absorb carbon dioxide and chemically release oxygen to enable survival, were found used when the craft was recovered, suggesting some of the crew survived for several days. Kolesnikov’s last note has a time of 15:15, indicating that he and the others in the aft compartment lived at least four hours after the explosion.[8]

              • Roger Bird

                I’m sorry. I thought that they were all vaporized in a microsecond. I am sorry.

    • fortyniner

      I’m not sure that transfer efficiency is going to be a limiting factor –
      I think one of Rossi’s main problems may be managing the primary cooling of a ‘hot cat’ core.

      From what we have been able to glean, these seem to want to run at high temps in the 300C+ range, and it’s likely that cooling below this point may quench the reaction. This essentially means that the primary coolant must run at this kind of temp with only a relatively small differential between input and output (i.e., fast flow rate) to avoid damping the reaction, but at the same time carrying off a useable amount of heat.

      Assuming the primary coolant is HT silicone oil or alkylene glycol, this implies that at the secondary stage (oil boiler) there must be an interface between primary coolant at 300C+ and water under pressure at say 120C, which would likely cause a vapour barrier to form at the transfer surface, preventing heat transfer. Also over-cooling the oil must be avoided.

      The most likely solution would seem to be a flash steam boiler of some kind. In addition, some kind of bypass or reheating arrangement would probably need to be employed in which oil that has been used to boil water is mixed with a bypass flow of hot oil to restore the temperature to some chosen set point before it flows back through the reactor.

    • Gordon Docherty

      The new SABRE engine contains a compact pre-cooler heat-exchanger that can take an incoming airstream from over 1,000C to -150C in less than 1/100th of a second:

      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23332592

      So, with a fully reusable space plane, you just need something lightweight to power the electronics when the engine is off… now, if only we had such a device 🙂

  • atanguy

    0.1% of 7 billions= 7 millions
    You are quite optimistic Frank! 😉

    • fortyniner

      I agree. I think quite a few more decimal points might be closer, at least for those who have actually understood what they have heard (another two at least, maybe three).

    • Hampus

      Many have heard of cold fusion when it was in the news 1989. But perhaps not that many know that it survived.

  • artefact

    Harry Veeder on Vortex:

    “Copied from a facebook group.
    Harry

    Officially confirmed.

    Roberta De Carolis (Tuesday, 16 July 2013 12:28).
    The CEO of Defkalion Europe Franco Cappiello wrote to us:
    “There will be an official announcement of this technology during ICCF 18
    (International Conference Cold Fusion 18) at the University of Missouri
    (USA). For those interested you can see this webcast of all phases of the
    experiment , ignition, performance and switching off. Two independent
    scientists and two science journalists at international level will
    participate in this broadcast, as well as a member of the Cicap. ”

    http://www.nextme.it/scienza/energia/6016-fusione-fredda-e-cat-defkalion-annuncio-fine-luglio

    • Gerrit

      that sounds pretty good.

      now they must also do it and not pull out at the last minute due to broken gaskets.

      interesting times ahead.

      • Boondogled

        theyll have a backup plan hopefully in such an event

    • freethinker

      I see a clear risk.

      If their demo fails, what will MSM make sure Joe and Jane associate ICCF with? MU?
      Not to mention LENR and Ecat? Buckle down, fasten your seatbelts. It may be a bumpy ride.

      Surprised I am, that to this risky demo they agreed. Seperate from ICCF and MU this demo should be.

      • Gerrit

        yes, if the demo fails or does not take place the naysayers and their media goons will savour it. If it does take place and it is successful they will dismiss it as meaningless.

        The naysayers will complain anyhow:

        – that the iccf-18 lends itself to commercial promotion which real science would surely never do. Thus in their eyes the iccf is not real science but merely a commercial 3 ring circus. (note that the complaint by naysayers has always been that no commercial devices are available, now that they are available they’ll complain that only real scientific understanding is important and science should stay away from commercial efforts.)

        – that the demo did not validate anything, there was no accurate independent measurement of input and output power and the people present were incompetent as they are no nuclear physicist.

        The naysayers will defend their position by raising the bar. The more intelligent of them will go silent one by one.

        I really wonder what the BBC reporter will produce. If it is a science journalist he is probably clueless how this can happen and side with the naysayers. Or he will simply publish nothing like that Associated Press guy Peter Svensson did.

        • Gerrit

          “you will bring me a peer reviewed paper” ->
          “you will bring me a funded scientific program” ->
          “you will bring me a commercial device” ->
          “you will bring me a shrubbery” ->
          “You will cut down the mightiest tree in the forest with…………..a…………..HERRING!!!”

          • Hampus

            NiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNiNi

        • fortyniner

          It is unlikely that the BBC will report anything at all – the UK Govt stance on CF is complete silence, which the BBC will slavishly reflect. The same probably goes for most of the MSM.

          It doesn’t matter – ICCF-18 is not intended for the sheeple, and a successful demo will be seen by those who matter (although I’m not actually sure whether that is a good thing on balance, until a commercial product is ready).

          • Gerrit

            if i remember correctly somewhere around end of 2011 or early 2012 there was a comment from the UK energy “agency” about the LENR field, saying something along the line of “we are keeping an eye on it, we do not dismiss it outright”

            • fortyniner

              That’s right. Recently though I’ve emailed the same ‘front end’ lady who said that, plus the two ministers in the energy department (Fallon and Davey) to ask what the current position is. I received an acknowledgement of receipt in one case but have not received a reply from any of them.

              Looks like this topic is now right off limits, probably because those concerned (maybe not including the ‘customer service’ lady at the Energy Dept) are desperate to get their new nuclear build going – for whatever reasons. Any discussion of a possible alternative seems to be totally verboten.

  • Kim

    I will say this

    and afterwards I will say more…

    Respect
    Kim

    • fortyniner

      Probably a good plan for most of us.

  • artefact

    nice article!