CNN Runs Feature Article on Current Nuclear Fusion Research (No Mention of Rossi)

CNN has just published a feature article by Thom Patterson about current research in the area of nuclear fusion in the “Powering the Planet” section of its web site. The article discusses some of the researchers and projects that are trying to find a way to create a new form of abundant clean energy.

Some key points from the article:

  • Michel Lebarge of General Fusion in Vancouver, Canada is leading a team of 50 researchers to find a way to fuse atoms using a “jackhammer” technique that uses giant shockwaves to slam atoms together. He’s received $32.5 million of funding so far.
  • ITER is a multinational nuclear fusion project under construction in Italy with funding of $20 billion.
  • The National Ignition Facility at California’s Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is investing $5 billion to try and create fusion using massive lasers.
  • China is training 2,000 researchers in the area of nuclear fusion in an attempt to achieve success in the field.

Curiously there is no mention in the article of Andrea Rossi’s  energy catalyzer which by all accounts is at a very mature stage of development and appears ready to be launched commercially. It certainly is relevant in a survey of fusion research — perhaps Thom Patterson is not familiar with Rossi’s work, or maybe he does not consider it credible enough to mention alongside the other projects in the article. I noticed that Rossi comes up in the comments below the article.

Whatever the case, it’s another example of how the mainstream media is giving little attention to what in the opinion of many now is a technology worthy of a great deal of  coverage because of the potential impact it can have. I think it’s just a matter of time before that changes, but it’s puzzling nevertheless.

  • Tom

    Star Scientific in Australia has perfected Muan Catalyzed Fusion. The ‘game changer’ has finally arrived. See video here. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7RqT9i5f4c&feature=youtube_gdata_player

    • Jazzman

      no doubt, this company is incredible. if they are what they say they are than it is a ‘gamechanger’ to say the least…

  • Esteban

    ITER is building in cadarache(FRENCH)

  • Wes

    The press, the scientific community, and the Congress bought into the hype, and subsequent implosion of the Pons and Fleischmann episode. The badly mismanaged publicity generated stellar expectations which could not be met, resulting in one of the greatest media “crash and burns” of our times. Read, “Voodoo Science: the Road from Foolishness to Fraud.” Rossi could power New York City, Paris, and the Vatican for a month and they still would not believe him. Credibility will be earned one success at a time, and this is probably the best for all. Rossi has 99.9 percent of the road to credibility left to travel, and at times he seems to be going in reverse.

  • Paul Mora

    So far, there is no proof the E-Cat produces more energy than it consumes. The measurements are too confusing.

    If Rossi wants to prove the E-Cat produces more energy than it consumes, he should stop vapourizing water, and use other methods to measure the thermal output. Just take a graphite cylinder (graphite is a good heat storage mean) with an electronic thermometer inside it, make the measurement of the temperature of the cylinder before it is put inside the E-Cat hot chamber, and after some minutes inside the hot chamber, make the measurement of the temperature again.

    • WaltC

      In defense of the original point, there’s no proof that General Fusion’s “Jackhammer” idea works either. Or that ITER will work… Main stream media reporters seem to be a lot more comfortable with “hot fusion” (that’s very expensive and may never work) than anything that sounds like “cold fusion” (that’s not very expensive and may never work). It’s somehow less embarrassing to talk about something that’s massive, and 20 years out, but never any closer than that, than something that makes positive but erratic progress like LENR/Cold fusion results have done.

      For whatever reason, very few reporters seem willing to talk about Rossi’s work, or Polywell Fusion and several similar efforts that are making steady progress with very little funding.

      Speaking as a taxpayer, I’d much sooner see more research funding go to a bunch of inexpensive “ground-breaking” fusion efforts like LENR, Polywell and so on, than huge all-or-nothing efforts like ITER.